Global health Christmas cards with vectors of disease

The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine in a snow globe

The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine in a snow globe


It’s getting to that time of year again. Despite being mid-November all the shops are FULL of Christmas things and playing festive songs.

This year, the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (where I work for my day job) kindly asked me to produce the designs for their Christmas cards again.

Continuing with the paper cut out theme I’ve developed for their cards (see 2013 and 2014 blog posts), I have produced two different designs. One is the School’s main building on Keppel Street, London, UK, in a snow globe (above) and the other is a series of baubles decorated with vectors of disease (below).

Why vectors of disease and what are they?

The main building of the School was built in 1926-29 and has wonderful art deco features, including a series of golden, or guilded, vectors of disease on the front of the building (Read more about the School’s history on this interactive timeline). Vectors of disease are animals that carry parasites that then get passed on to humans, for example the mosquito is a vector that carries the malaria parasite. The parasite infects us humans when the mosquito feeds on our blood.

Can you guess what the vectors are?

Vectors of disease baubles

 – Buy the cards at the School’s reception or in the WE ARE STARDUST Etsy shop

All proceeds go towards the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine’s scholarship fund which ensures the School can continue to educate the public health leaders of tomorrow, particularly those from low-income settings where public health experts are desperately needed.

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